Wage & Hour

  • May 21, 2024

    Paramount Pictures Violated Wage Laws, Crew Member Says

    Paramount Pictures Corp. failed to pay crew members working on movie productions their total wages, denied them proper rest breaks and refused to reimburse them for out-of-pocket expenses, according to a proposed Private Attorneys General Act class action filed Monday in California state court.

  • May 21, 2024

    Calif. Justices Doubt App-Based Drivers' Prop 22 Challenge

    Several California Supreme Court justices pushed back Tuesday against arguments by ride-hailing drivers that the Proposition 22 ballot measure carving out certain app-based workers from a worker classification law unconstitutionally runs afoul of the Legislature's authority, with one justice saying their position could "freeze out" voter-approved initiatives.

  • May 21, 2024

    Foxwoods Restaurant Servers Win Class Cert. in Wage Feud

    A Connecticut state court judge has granted certification to a class of tipped workers in their wage-and-hour suit against a steakhouse at the Foxwoods Resort Casino, ruling they have plausibly shown that the restaurant failed to pay them a fair wage under state law.

  • May 21, 2024

    Colo. Hotel Denies Directly Hiring H-2B Workers In Wage Suit

    A Colorado luxury hotel told a federal judge that it doesn't belong in a proposed class action accusing it and its cleaning contractor of unlawfully deducting Mexican housekeeping workers' wages, saying the contractor is the workers' sole employer.

  • May 21, 2024

    DOL Says Challenge To New DOL Contractor Rule Can't Stand

    The U.S. Department of Labor said Tuesday its final rule sorting out whether workers are independent contractors or employees under federal law complies with the law, urging a Louisiana federal judge to toss five business groups' challenge to the rule.

  • May 21, 2024

    Some DOL Informers To Be Disclosed In Fishery Wage Case

    A Mississippi federal judge ordered the U.S. Department of Labor to disclose the identities of migrant workers with knowledge of a fishery's alleged interference with a DOL investigation or of allegations the fishery retaliated against workers cooperating in the probe.

  • May 21, 2024

    NY HVAC Co. To Pay $15K For Demanding Wage Kickbacks

    A Long Island, New York, HVAC company will pay $15,000 in fines for threatening to fire workers if they did not kick back wage payments recovered in a U.S. Department of Labor probe, the agency announced.

  • May 21, 2024

    Dairy Queen Franchisee Seeks To Expedite DOL OT Rule Row

    A Dairy Queen franchisee and its owner urged the Fifth Circuit to speed things along in their challenge to the U.S. Department of Labor's higher salaries used to consider whether employees are overtime-exempt, saying that the newest final rule will exacerbate their harm.

  • May 21, 2024

    Littler Hires Employment Advice Leader From Lewis Brisbois

    The co-chair of Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP's employment advice and counseling practice has joined Littler Mendelson PC's Providence, Rhode Island, office, the firm announced.

  • May 21, 2024

    NC Panel Cans Atty's 'Grossly Excessive' Fees In Wage Suit

    A North Carolina appeals court rejected a real estate agent's bid to be awarded nearly $500,000 in attorney fees after winning an unpaid wages lawsuit, reasoning Tuesday that state wage law doesn't require that fees be granted to a prevailing party.

  • May 21, 2024

    Calif. Mushroom Farms Pay $530K After DOL Probe

    Two mushroom farms in California paid nearly $530,000 for underpaying 62 workers and providing them with unsafe housing, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

  • May 21, 2024

    Strategic Hiring Was The New Normal For BigLaw In 2023

    The 400 largest law firms by headcount in the U.S. grew more slowly in 2023 than in the previous two years, while Kirkland & Ellis LLP surpassed the 3,000-attorney threshold, according to the latest Law360 ranking.

  • May 21, 2024

    The Law360 400: Tracking The Largest US Law Firms

    The legal market expanded more tentatively in 2023 than in previous years amid a slowdown in demand for legal services, especially in transactions, an area that has been sluggish but is expected to quicken in the near future.

  • May 21, 2024

    Georgia State Farm Office, Ex-Worker Settle Overtime Suit

    A State Farm franchise reached a settlement with a former insurance agent producer, putting to rest claims the company misclassified him as an overtime-exempt salaried worker, failing to pay him overtime wages in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

  • May 21, 2024

    Construction Groups Press To Halt DOL Prevailing Wage Rule

    The U.S. Department of Labor's final rule regulating prevailing wages under the Davis-Bacon Act creates tangible damage and a Texas federal court should stop it, a group of construction groups suing the department said.

  • May 21, 2024

    4th Circ. Ruling Is Rare Take On FLSA Coverage For Inmates

    A Fourth Circuit decision this month stands out for opening the door to classifying certain incarcerated workers as employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act, representing another shift in the legal discourse around people behind bars, attorneys say.

  • May 21, 2024

    Ex-Workers Drop Gender Bias Suit Against Ga. Medical Cos.

    Two female former human resources workers for a medical management company and a podiatrist center told a Georgia federal court they had agreed to drop their lawsuit accusing their ex-employers of discriminating against them based on gender, reclassifying them as hourly and firing them for complaining.

  • May 21, 2024

    3rd Circ. Revives American Airlines Pilots' Military Leave Suit

    The Third Circuit reopened a class action Tuesday accusing American Airlines of unlawfully denying pilots pay for short military assignments while compensating employees for jury duty and bereavement leave, ruling a trial is needed to determine whether time off for military service is fungible with paid absences.

  • May 21, 2024

    Las Vegas Restaurants Pay $161K For OT Violations

    Three Las Vegas restaurants paid nearly $161,000 in back wages, damages and fines for denying 33 workers their overtime pay, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

  • May 20, 2024

    FTC Says Albertsons Execs Deleted Texts In Kroger Case

    Kroger and the Federal Trade Commission are at each other's throats over discovery in the agency's in-house challenge to the grocery giant's $25 billion merger with Albertsons and in district court, with the grocers accusing the agency of "running out the clock" and the FTC accusing the grocers of deleting text messages.

  • May 20, 2024

    Zara Strikes $1.25M Deal To Settle Workers' Overtime Suit

    Fast-fashion retailer Zara agreed to a $1.25 million deal to settle accusations that it shortchanged about 500 employees by excluding commissions from overtime calculations, according to a letter filed with a New York federal judge requesting approval of the settlement.

  • May 20, 2024

    Food Co. Workers Tell High Court to Keep 4th Circ. OT Ruling

    Sales workers for an international food distributor urged the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday not to review a Fourth Circuit ruling holding that they did not qualify for overtime exemption, saying it would be a waste of the high court's time and resources to mull an inconsequential question.

  • May 20, 2024

    Minn. Lawmakers OK Pay Rates For Uber, Lyft Drivers

    The Minnesota Legislature passed a bill setting Uber and Lyft drivers' per-mile and per-minute rates, a move that comes after two years of negotiations during which the ride-hailing giants threatened to partially cease offering their services in the state.

  • May 20, 2024

    Boar's Head Can't Untangle Collective In NY Late Pay Suit

    A New York federal judge said Boar's Head can't get reconsideration of an order greenlighting a collective in a late pay suit because the workers in the case supported their claims, but granted the deli meat and cheese company's request to rework the collective definition.

  • May 20, 2024

    Wyndham Wants Out Of Pa. Hotel's Labor Trafficking Case

    Wyndham Hotels & Resorts argued to a federal court Monday it could not be plausibly alleged the chain knew or could have known that its former franchisee at a New Stanton, Pennsylvania, Days Inn was exploiting laborers in a room-for-hire scheme, and so it should be dismissed from the laborers' lawsuit.

Expert Analysis

  • History Supports 2nd Circ. View Of FAA Transport Exemption

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    In the circuit split over when transport workers are exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act, sparked by the 2022 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Southwest Airlines v. Saxon, the Second Circuit reached a more faithful interpretation — one supported by historical litigation and legislative context, though perhaps arrived at via the wrong route, say Joshua Wesneski and Crystal Weeks at Weil.

  • Employers Need Clarity On FLSA Joint Employer Liability

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    A judicial patchwork of multifactor tests to determine joint employment liability has led to unpredictable results, and only congressional action or enactment of a uniform standard to which courts will consistently defer can give employers the clarity needed to structure their relationships with workers, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Calif. Independent Contractor Lessons From Grubhub Suit

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    California courts have been creating little in the way of clarity when it comes to the employment status of gig workers — and a recent federal court decision in Lawson v. Grubhub illustrates how status may change with the winds of litigation, offering four takeaways for businesses that rely on delivery drivers, say Esra Hudson and Marah Bragdon at Manatt.

  • Labor Collusion Loss Will Shape DOJ's Case Strategy

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    Following the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent loss in United States v. Manahe, tallying its trial score record to 0-3 in labor-related antitrust cases over the past year, defendants can expect that the DOJ will try to exclude defense evidence and argue for more favorable jury instructions, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Staffing Company Considerations Amid PAGA Uncertainty

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    The impending California Supreme Court decision in Adolph v. Uber is expected to affect staffing companies, specifically how the proliferation of nonindividual Private Attorneys General Act claims are handled when the individual claim is compelled to arbitration, say Sarah Kroll-Rosenbaum and Harrison Thorne at Akerman.

  • Eye On Compliance: Joint Employment

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    Madonna Herman at Wilson Elser breaks down the key job conditions that led to a recent National Labor Relations Board finding of joint employment, and explains the similar standard established under California case law — providing a guide for companies that want to minimize liability when relying on temporary and contract workers.

  • How Unions Could Stem Possible Wave Of Calif. PAGA Claims

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    Should the California Supreme Court hold in Adolph v. Uber that the nonindividual portions of Private Attorneys General Act claims survive even after individual claims go to arbitration, employers and unions could both leverage the holding in Oswald v. Murray to stifle the resurgence in representative suits, say attorneys at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Tips For Defending Employee Plaintiff Depositions

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    A plaintiff cannot win their employment case through a good deposition, but they can certainly lose it with a bad one, so an attorney should take steps to make sure the plaintiff does as little damage as possible to their claim, says Preston Satchell at LexisNexis.

  • Predictions On Salary Levels In Proposed DOL Overtime Rule

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    In May, the U.S. Department of Labor is expected to propose new salary thresholds for overtime exemptions for both executive, administrative and professional employees and highly compensated earners under the Fair Labor Standards Act, and based on methodologies used in recent DOL rules, it will likely increase both thresholds, says Stephen Bronars at Edgeworth.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Whistleblowing Insights From 'Dahmer'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with DS Smith's Josh Burnette about how the show "Dahmer – Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story" provides an extreme example of the perils of ignoring repeat complaints — a lesson employers could apply in the whistleblower context.

  • Retail Employer Strategies For LA Fair Work Week Ordinance

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    The recently effective Los Angeles Fair Work Week Ordinance changes how employers in the retail trade industry approach scheduling and hiring employees, so they should consider creating new standardized forms and procedures to maintain compliance and avoid penalties, say Thomas Petrides and Charlie Wang at Vedder Price.

  • AI For Advancing Diversity In The Workplace: Friend Or Foe?

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    In the wake of calls for increased workplace diversity, employers are turning to artificial intelligence to automate hiring and cut costs to reach environmental, social and governance objectives, but this technology requires human oversight to minimize biases and discrimination, say Consuela Pinto and Dawn Siler-Nixon at FordHarrison.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Attendance Policies

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    Employee attendance problems are among the most common reasons for disciplinary action and discharge, which is why a clear policy neatly laid out in an employee handbook is necessary to articulate expectations for workers and support an employer's position should any attendance-related disputes arise, says Kara Shea at Butler Snow.