Wage & Hour

  • June 12, 2024

    Construction Co. Owes $353K For H-2A Violations, DOL Says

    A Nebraska construction company operating in California must pay nearly $353,000 in back wages and fines for denying 43 workers their full wages and rights under the H-2A temporary worker program, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Wednesday.

  • June 12, 2024

    Texas Firm Accused Of Misclassifying Paralegal As Contractor

    A Texas personal injury law firm misclassified a paralegal as an independent contractor and its director constantly changed the paralegal's time sheets, resulting in unpaid wages, she told a Texas federal court.

  • June 12, 2024

    Magistrate Endorses Axing OT Suit But Allowing 2nd Chance

    A federal magistrate judge advised tossing an unpaid overtime lawsuit against a California cold storage company that specializes in packing agricultural goods, but said the worker should have an opportunity to flesh out their claims.

  • June 12, 2024

    DOL Hits IHOP Franchises With FLSA Suit

    The owner of IHOP franchises in Illinois owes more than $568,000 in back wages, damages and fines for denying workers their full tips and wages, the U.S. Department of Labor said in a complaint.

  • June 11, 2024

    DOL's H-2A Protections Rule Flouts Labor Law, GOP AGs Say

    The U.S. Department of Labor's final rule including protections for foreign farmworkers within the H-2A visa program doesn't comport with federal labor law, a group of Republican attorneys general claimed in Georgia federal court, saying the rule doesn't give the same rights to U.S. citizen workers.

  • June 11, 2024

    9th Circ.'s AB 5 Ruling Leaves Less Hope For Striking Law

    A full Ninth Circuit ruling that California's Assembly Bill 5 doesn't violate certain businesses' equal protection rights is, for now, likely the end to yet another argument parties have used to challenge the worker classification law.

  • June 11, 2024

    Dem Bill Would Cancel 2018 High Court Ruling On Arbitration

    House and Senate Democrats reintroduced legislation Tuesday that would do away with mandatory workplace arbitration agreements, a move they said would counteract a 2018 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that said requiring solo arbitration in worker disputes didn't violate federal labor law.

  • June 11, 2024

    Home Depot Again Notches Win In OT Suit

    A California federal court ruled that although a group of workers accusing Home Depot of unpaid overtime set forth enough new evidence to reconsider a win the home improvement chain snagged, the workers didn't sustain their arguments that the company purposely tried to dodge overtime laws.

  • June 11, 2024

    Attys Must Justify Bid For Extra Fees From Tip Deal Leftovers

    The attorneys representing workers accusing restaurant chain Famous Dave's of violating tip regulations will need to justify why they are trying to get a portion of unclaimed funds in an almost $1 million deal, a Maryland federal judge ruled.

  • June 11, 2024

    NC Truck Drivers Get $242K Atty Fee In Wage Suit Deal

    A North Carolina federal judge has awarded a class of truck drivers for a shredding company just under $242,000 in attorney fees on top of a $725,000 settlement to resolve claims the company deducted pay for meal breaks they did not take.

  • June 11, 2024

    Labcorp Workers' $2.4M Wage Deal Wins Court Approval

    A California federal judge placed the final stamp of approval on a $2.4 million deal ending class claims that Labcorp failed to pay overtime wages for the time carriers spent driving to and from locations and violated state meal and break laws.

  • June 11, 2024

    Lacrosse Coach Loses Bias Suit After Getting Cozen Booted

    A Pennsylvania federal judge tossed a lawsuit Tuesday from a high school lacrosse coach who said her contract wasn't renewed because of gender, age and disability bias, finding the school district showed that its decision stemmed from concerns about her professionalism.

  • June 11, 2024

    Childcare Custodian's Weekly Wage Suit Can Continue

    A childcare center custodian can continue with his claim that the center operators failed to pay him weekly wages as state law requires for workers who perform manual labor, a New York federal judge ruled, but cut his claim that the center didn't provide proper wage notices.

  • June 11, 2024

    Fla. Judge OKs Strip Club And Dancers' $165K Wage Deal

    A South Florida strip club operator will pay $165,000 to dancers who claimed they were misclassified as independent contractors and denied minimum wages, under a settlement agreement approved by a federal judge.

  • June 11, 2024

    GRSM50 Adds Labor And Employment Pro In San Diego

    Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP has hired as a partner for its employment law practice an attorney with prior private practice experience who has also worked for multiple companies and a labor union during her more than 20-year career.

  • June 11, 2024

    NM Restaurants Pay $254K For Tip, Wage Violations

    Two restaurant franchise locations in New Mexico paid more than $254,000 in back wages, damages and fines for keeping a portion of workers' tips and denying them minimum and overtime wage rates, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

  • June 11, 2024

    Parts Of Tesla Wage Suit To Lead To Arbitration, Judge Rules

    Twelve current and former Tesla employees will need to bring claims that they worked through meal and rest breaks to an arbitrator, a California federal judge ruled, rejecting arguments that their signatures on arbitration pacts were forged.

  • June 11, 2024

    Ex-Papa John's Driver's Race Harassment, Pay Suit Proceeds

    A Black former pizza delivery driver for a Papa John's franchise can pursue his claims that he faced a hostile work environment and was underreimbursed for mileage, an Alabama federal judge ruled, but the judge limited the methods the worker can use to prove his allegations.

  • June 10, 2024

    Introducing Law360's Pay Disclosure Law Tracker

    A movement to tackle discriminatory pay gaps has swept the U.S. in recent years as nearly half of states have enacted bans on salary history requests while almost a dozen have issued laws that require employers to share what they're willing to pay for a position. Law360 has created an interactive, nationwide map tracking these salary history bans and pay transparency requirements.

  • June 10, 2024

    Uber Black Drivers Aren't Like Plumbers, Philly Jury Told

    Uber Black drivers on Monday tried for a second time to convince a Pennsylvania federal jury that the ride-sharing company owes them the same perks as employees, saying they're nothing like plumbers, the quintessential independent contractors.

  • June 10, 2024

    Migrant Cleaners Rebuff Colo. Hotel's Bid To Ditch Wage Suit

    The migrant contractor staff that cleaned a Colorado luxury hotel slammed the hotel's efforts to escape claims of underpaying its workers, telling a Colorado federal court Monday that the hotel set the terms of their employment.

  • June 10, 2024

    Full 9th Circ. Rules AB5 And Its Exemptions Are Lawful

    The California Legislature had a plausible reason for creating certain carveouts from a state law governing whether workers are employees or independent contractors, the full Ninth Circuit ruled Monday, departing from a panel's decision that Assembly Bill 5 disfavors companies such as Uber.

  • June 10, 2024

    Cozen O'Connor Booted From Pa. Equal Pay Case

    Cozen O'Connor has been booted off a Pennsylvania school district's equal-pay lawsuit that was being overseen by a judge with personal ties to the firm, according to an order the judge issued Monday.

  • June 10, 2024

    FordHarrison Makes Associate Hires Across 5 Offices

    FordHarrison LLP announced that it made associate hires across five of the employment law firm's office locations including Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.

  • June 10, 2024

    Duane Morris Rehires Employment Partner From Cooley

    A labor and employment attorney who spent nearly two decades at Duane Morris LLP has rejoined the firm after working at Cooley LLP the past few years.

Expert Analysis

  • Predictions On Salary Levels In Proposed DOL Overtime Rule

    Author Photo

    In May, the U.S. Department of Labor is expected to propose new salary thresholds for overtime exemptions for both executive, administrative and professional employees and highly compensated earners under the Fair Labor Standards Act, and based on methodologies used in recent DOL rules, it will likely increase both thresholds, says Stephen Bronars at Edgeworth.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Whistleblowing Insights From 'Dahmer'

    Author Photo

    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with DS Smith's Josh Burnette about how the show "Dahmer – Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story" provides an extreme example of the perils of ignoring repeat complaints — a lesson employers could apply in the whistleblower context.

  • Retail Employer Strategies For LA Fair Work Week Ordinance

    Author Photo

    The recently effective Los Angeles Fair Work Week Ordinance changes how employers in the retail trade industry approach scheduling and hiring employees, so they should consider creating new standardized forms and procedures to maintain compliance and avoid penalties, say Thomas Petrides and Charlie Wang at Vedder Price.

  • AI For Advancing Diversity In The Workplace: Friend Or Foe?

    Author Photo

    In the wake of calls for increased workplace diversity, employers are turning to artificial intelligence to automate hiring and cut costs to reach environmental, social and governance objectives, but this technology requires human oversight to minimize biases and discrimination, say Consuela Pinto and Dawn Siler-Nixon at FordHarrison.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Attendance Policies

    Author Photo

    Employee attendance problems are among the most common reasons for disciplinary action and discharge, which is why a clear policy neatly laid out in an employee handbook is necessary to articulate expectations for workers and support an employer's position should any attendance-related disputes arise, says Kara Shea at Butler Snow.

  • Noncompete Ban Is Key To Empowering Low-Wage Workers

    Author Photo

    The Federal Trade Commission's proposed ban on noncompete clauses is needed because limitations alone have very little practical value to low-wage workers, who will continue to be hurt by the mere existence of these clauses unless they are outlawed, says Brendan Lynch at Community Legal Services of Philadelphia.

  • Top 5 Issues For Employers If Their Bank Suddenly Fails

    Author Photo

    The sudden closure of a bank can create a host of ripple effects, and if such a liquidity crisis occurs, employers should prioritize fulfilling their payroll obligations, as failing to do so could subject employers and even certain company personnel to substantial penalties, say attorneys at Manatt.

  • Prepare Now To Comply With NJ Temp Worker Law

    Author Photo

    New Jersey temporary staffing firms and their clients must prepare now for the time-consuming compliance requirements created by the controversial new Temporary Laborers' Bill of Rights, or face steep penalties when the law's strict wage, benefit and record-keeping rules go live in May and August, say attorneys at Duane Morris.

  • Employment-Related Litigation Risks Facing Hospitality Cos.

    Author Photo

    A close look at recent hospitality industry employment claims highlights key issues companies should keep an eye out for, and insurance policy considerations for managing risk related to wage and hour, privacy, and human trafficking claims, say Jan Larson and Huiyi Chen at Jenner & Block.

  • Acquiring A Company That Uses A Professional Employer Org.

    Author Photo

    With the professional employer organization industry rapidly expanding, those seeking to acquire a company that uses a PEO should understand there are several employment- and benefits-related complexities, especially in regard to retirement, health and welfare plans, say Megan Monson and Taryn Cannataro at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • What Could Lie Ahead For Prop 22 After Calif. Appellate Ruling

    Author Photo

    On the heels of a California appeals court’s recent decision to uphold Proposition 22 — which allows gig companies to classify workers as independent contractors — an analysis of related rulings and legislation over the past five years should provide context for the next phase of this battle, says Rex Berry at Signature Resolution.

  • 3rd Circ. Ruling Offers Tools To Manage Exempt Employees

    Author Photo

    The Third Circuit’s recent opinion in Higgins v. Bayada Home Health, finding the Fair Labor Standards Act allows employers to deduct paid time off for missed employee productivity targets, gives companies another resource for managing exempt employee inefficiency or absenteeism, says Laura Lawless at Squire Patton.

  • Illinois Paid Leave Law May Create Obstacles For Employers

    Author Photo

    Illinois' Paid Leave for All Workers Act, which goes into effect next year, could create issues and potential liability for employers due to its ambiguity, so companies should review and modify existing workplace policies to prevent challenges, including understaffing, says Matt Tyrrell at Schoenberg Finkel.